brightly_woven: (books_flair)
I bought a new iPod.  Which was really bad for my "read 50 paper-printed books this year" goal.  I have listened to over 120 hours of novels since I last posted about a paper book.  No wonder my kids don't think I read.  (I have listened to some on speaker--car or computer--so don't worry for my ears.)

In any case, I just finished another kids' book called Where the Broken Heart Still Beats. I enjoyed it, but it was very sad on many levels.  It was a story about a girl who had been kidnapped by Comanche's in the 1840's and then is re-found and captured back by her family in the 1860s.  By that time, she is totally assimilated in Comanche culture and has a husband and 3 children, the baby girl is recaptured with her.  Instead of being happy to be reunited with her family, she longs for her Comanche ways/family/life.  Her white family thinks they are doing the best thing for her, but she violently disagrees.  In the end, none of them are really glad about how things end up.  I give it 3/5.

This book is apparently based on a real-life story.  It was interesting and would provoke a lot of conversation with E if he read it, but also so sad that I'm not sure I'll recommend it.  The 4th and 5th grade curriculum for reading is already pretty bleak.

Will I have time between now and the New Year to read 8 more paper books?  Probably not.

Regardless, this process has been great and has reconnected me with the printed page. 



brightly_woven: (books_flair)
I bought a new iPod.  Which was really bad for my "read 50 paper-printed books this year" goal.  I have listened to over 120 hours of novels since I last posted about a paper book.  No wonder my kids don't think I read.  (I have listened to some on speaker--car or computer--so don't worry for my ears.)

In any case, I just finished another kids' book called Where the Broken Heart Still Beats. I enjoyed it, but it was very sad on many levels.  It was a story about a girl who had been kidnapped by Comanche's in the 1840's and then is re-found and captured back by her family in the 1860s.  By that time, she is totally assimilated in Comanche culture and has a husband and 3 children, the baby girl is recaptured with her.  Instead of being happy to be reunited with her family, she longs for her Comanche ways/family/life.  Her white family thinks they are doing the best thing for her, but she violently disagrees.  In the end, none of them are really glad about how things end up.  I give it 3/5.

This book is apparently based on a real-life story.  It was interesting and would provoke a lot of conversation with E if he read it, but also so sad that I'm not sure I'll recommend it.  The 4th and 5th grade curriculum for reading is already pretty bleak.

Will I have time between now and the New Year to read 8 more paper books?  Probably not.

Regardless, this process has been great and has reconnected me with the printed page. 



brightly_woven: (Keats/books)

I don't know if I mentioned my recent (post-TomVo) fixation with British mystery series, but we've never been in to them until this year.  Now that we have DVR capabilities (aka the TomVo, made by Tom) and also Netflix, Watch Instantly, capabilities for free, I've taken to watching all the British mystery series I can get my hands on. 

I have always been a huge Anne Perry fan and adore Peter Wimsey down to his well-shod toes, but haven't picked up an Agatha Christie since high school when I read all our library had (we did 10 Little Indians for the Fall Play my freshman year--I was on make-up crew, but read the book anyway) nor have I gotten into more than an occasional PD James on the contemporary front.  

I don't tend to like contemporary mystery nearly as much as period.  Surprise, surprise.

I digress.

My "Masterpiece Mystery" (read: BBC stuff on American PBS) has lead me to Elizabeth George, an American writer whose contemporary "Inspector Lynley" mysteries are set in the UK.  I've prob. seen about 1/2 of the ones that are available on video/TV, with more on the way, but I decided to read the most recent one Careless in Red for my 41st book.

Whew.  I'm tired just explaining my choice.

I really enjoyed it and for once felt that the balance of clues and red herrings was such that I guess it before he did, but only by a chapter, so I was very entertained throughout.

The only problem was that I've never been to Cornwall, and don't think of the UK as a major surfing location, so I kept feeling like we were in CA somewhere from time to time.

All in all, I'd say 4/5.

But at least .5 of that is probably just that I'm half in love with Lynley himself.  Poor tortured soul.

:)

Meg
 

brightly_woven: (Keats/books)

I don't know if I mentioned my recent (post-TomVo) fixation with British mystery series, but we've never been in to them until this year.  Now that we have DVR capabilities (aka the TomVo, made by Tom) and also Netflix, Watch Instantly, capabilities for free, I've taken to watching all the British mystery series I can get my hands on. 

I have always been a huge Anne Perry fan and adore Peter Wimsey down to his well-shod toes, but haven't picked up an Agatha Christie since high school when I read all our library had (we did 10 Little Indians for the Fall Play my freshman year--I was on make-up crew, but read the book anyway) nor have I gotten into more than an occasional PD James on the contemporary front.  

I don't tend to like contemporary mystery nearly as much as period.  Surprise, surprise.

I digress.

My "Masterpiece Mystery" (read: BBC stuff on American PBS) has lead me to Elizabeth George, an American writer whose contemporary "Inspector Lynley" mysteries are set in the UK.  I've prob. seen about 1/2 of the ones that are available on video/TV, with more on the way, but I decided to read the most recent one Careless in Red for my 41st book.

Whew.  I'm tired just explaining my choice.

I really enjoyed it and for once felt that the balance of clues and red herrings was such that I guess it before he did, but only by a chapter, so I was very entertained throughout.

The only problem was that I've never been to Cornwall, and don't think of the UK as a major surfing location, so I kept feeling like we were in CA somewhere from time to time.

All in all, I'd say 4/5.

But at least .5 of that is probably just that I'm half in love with Lynley himself.  Poor tortured soul.

:)

Meg
 

brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
the sequel to the smut. 

'nuff said

There are no more published so I am done.

*slinks away*
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
the sequel to the smut. 

'nuff said

There are no more published so I am done.

*slinks away*
brightly_woven: (who's_your_daddy)
Finished Breaking Dawn.

After a rocky beginning, (EDIT: agree with every comment about the kid's STUPID NAME.) I actually ended up liking it quite a bit.  It was sappy in the extreme.  But I'm a sap.

I don't have nearly the level of analysis that others have done, but I'm sure you either a.) don't care about BD at all or b.) have heard many responses already.

All in all, a better book than I expected it to be.

3.5/5

P.S. [profile] julielu and I are having high tea tomorrow at the Ritz!  Fun. 
brightly_woven: (who's_your_daddy)
Finished Breaking Dawn.

After a rocky beginning, (EDIT: agree with every comment about the kid's STUPID NAME.) I actually ended up liking it quite a bit.  It was sappy in the extreme.  But I'm a sap.

I don't have nearly the level of analysis that others have done, but I'm sure you either a.) don't care about BD at all or b.) have heard many responses already.

All in all, a better book than I expected it to be.

3.5/5

P.S. [profile] julielu and I are having high tea tomorrow at the Ritz!  Fun. 
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
You may wonder where this surge of reading has come from.  Well, my mom is here.  And she's a cleaner/organizer/play with the kids-er to such an extent that I always have way more time with her as a guest than I do without.

Book 31 was Dark Assassin by Anne Perry.  Late Victorian murder mystery against the backdrop of the time when London was being tunneled out for improved sewers, etc.  A William Monk novel (and I'm more a fan of Thomas and Charlotte Pitt) which blends detection and social justice.

Weird to read after a derivative work, but Perry is the superior writer.  However, I'm not sure this is the superior work...I'll give it the same.

3.5/5
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
You may wonder where this surge of reading has come from.  Well, my mom is here.  And she's a cleaner/organizer/play with the kids-er to such an extent that I always have way more time with her as a guest than I do without.

Book 31 was Dark Assassin by Anne Perry.  Late Victorian murder mystery against the backdrop of the time when London was being tunneled out for improved sewers, etc.  A William Monk novel (and I'm more a fan of Thomas and Charlotte Pitt) which blends detection and social justice.

Weird to read after a derivative work, but Perry is the superior writer.  However, I'm not sure this is the superior work...I'll give it the same.

3.5/5
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
Hey!  I might actually make it!

As summer winds down and Ethan is off to camp, I've had more time to read (plus I haven't been at the computer as much--no work right now, and no homework either).

Book 29 is "Captain Wentworth's Diary" by Amanda Grange.

Good, easy read.  Not as in-depth as Susan Kaye's work.  No really developed OCs, for example, but P is my favorite JA (most days) and I love imagining what the year 06 might have been like, which is about 1/3 of the book.

I'd give it 3/5.
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
Hey!  I might actually make it!

As summer winds down and Ethan is off to camp, I've had more time to read (plus I haven't been at the computer as much--no work right now, and no homework either).

Book 29 is "Captain Wentworth's Diary" by Amanda Grange.

Good, easy read.  Not as in-depth as Susan Kaye's work.  No really developed OCs, for example, but P is my favorite JA (most days) and I love imagining what the year 06 might have been like, which is about 1/3 of the book.

I'd give it 3/5.
brightly_woven: (Mary/Collins by Katharino)
Suspense and Sensibility by Carrie Bebris is my eleventh book. 

Hmmmmm....there be spoilers ahead.....

Again, the main hook/problem/trope/whatever of the book depends on a sort of early 20c spiritualism (a la ouija boards, mediums, seances, etc.)  None of those things is present, but we are supposed to buy into something totally out of the realm of both scientific reality and the religious framework of Austen's time as the main explanation for the bizarre events in the book. 

I just don't.

Sigh.

Also, the "mystery" does not take place until late in the book and is so easy to "solve" its laughable.

Why can't these mysteries actually be like old school Scooby Doo--where the weird spiritual explanation really has a concrete, real world one???

I wanna love these books.  She writes fairly well.  Her characters are fairly in character.  The books are fun.  Bringing the Darcys and Dashwoods together at the right ages, etc. is clever and fun.  I love Lizzy and Darcy in them.

I just don't "believe".

Now before you think it's because of my own religious beliefs or doubts or whatever, I will say in my defense that I love Judith Merkle Riley's books where the beliefs of the day (angels, saints, etc.) are all true and come to interact with the people that people her books.  I love fantasy.  I love magic.

I've even love some of these elements mixed in with Pride and Prejudice.  (a la Disenchanted from the DWG board)

But Bebris does not make a believer out of me in her world.

Too bad.

Cuz now I own 3 of them...

2.5 out of 5 stars.

On to read, "Heart of Light".

Meg
brightly_woven: (Mary/Collins by Katharino)
Suspense and Sensibility by Carrie Bebris is my eleventh book. 

Hmmmmm....there be spoilers ahead.....

Again, the main hook/problem/trope/whatever of the book depends on a sort of early 20c spiritualism (a la ouija boards, mediums, seances, etc.)  None of those things is present, but we are supposed to buy into something totally out of the realm of both scientific reality and the religious framework of Austen's time as the main explanation for the bizarre events in the book. 

I just don't.

Sigh.

Also, the "mystery" does not take place until late in the book and is so easy to "solve" its laughable.

Why can't these mysteries actually be like old school Scooby Doo--where the weird spiritual explanation really has a concrete, real world one???

I wanna love these books.  She writes fairly well.  Her characters are fairly in character.  The books are fun.  Bringing the Darcys and Dashwoods together at the right ages, etc. is clever and fun.  I love Lizzy and Darcy in them.

I just don't "believe".

Now before you think it's because of my own religious beliefs or doubts or whatever, I will say in my defense that I love Judith Merkle Riley's books where the beliefs of the day (angels, saints, etc.) are all true and come to interact with the people that people her books.  I love fantasy.  I love magic.

I've even love some of these elements mixed in with Pride and Prejudice.  (a la Disenchanted from the DWG board)

But Bebris does not make a believer out of me in her world.

Too bad.

Cuz now I own 3 of them...

2.5 out of 5 stars.

On to read, "Heart of Light".

Meg

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