brightly_woven: (poisoninjest_drugs)
Andrea had asked about book club books on Twitter, and since I have a list of books, I thought I would post, even though she was mostly asking M. (Is it butting in when the post is on Twitter?) :)

Here are the books that our book club has read that I would recommend.  Either they were good, great, or at least they sparked interesting discussions. I removed books that I didn't like or didn't lead to good discussions.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society   Shaffer and Barrows
Water for Elephants   Sara Gruen
The Help    Kathryn Stockett
Mistress of the Art of Death    Ariana Franklin
The Dragon Tattoo   Stieg Larsson
The Hunger Games  Suzanne Collins
Major Pettigrew's Last Stand    Helen Simonson
Flowers for Algernon  Daniel Keyes
The Tigers Wife   Tea Obreht
State of Wonder   Ann Patchett
The Snow Child   Euowyn Ivey
Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother   Amy Chua
Those Who Save Us   Jenna Blum
The Night Circus   Erin Morgenstern
The Secret Keeper    Kate Morton
The Fault in our Stars   John Green
The 19th Wife   David Ebershoff
Wonder   RJ Palacio
Beautiful Ruins  Jess Water
Persuasion   Jane Austen
Olive Kitteridge    Elizabeth Strout (I debated removing this, but it did spark good discussions)
David and Goliath  Malcolm Gladwell
The Book Thief    Markus Zusak
Gone Girl   Gillian Flynn
The Orphan Master’s Son   Adam Johnson

 
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
Hey!  I might actually make it!

As summer winds down and Ethan is off to camp, I've had more time to read (plus I haven't been at the computer as much--no work right now, and no homework either).

Book 29 is "Captain Wentworth's Diary" by Amanda Grange.

Good, easy read.  Not as in-depth as Susan Kaye's work.  No really developed OCs, for example, but P is my favorite JA (most days) and I love imagining what the year 06 might have been like, which is about 1/3 of the book.

I'd give it 3/5.
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
Hey!  I might actually make it!

As summer winds down and Ethan is off to camp, I've had more time to read (plus I haven't been at the computer as much--no work right now, and no homework either).

Book 29 is "Captain Wentworth's Diary" by Amanda Grange.

Good, easy read.  Not as in-depth as Susan Kaye's work.  No really developed OCs, for example, but P is my favorite JA (most days) and I love imagining what the year 06 might have been like, which is about 1/3 of the book.

I'd give it 3/5.
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
In trying to make up for lost time, I am reading some romance novels (they are shorter by far than most books I've read this year): so far, one steamy, one demure.  The steamy one was an Edwardian called "Private Arrangements".  2.5/3  Totally ridiculous but quite a romp nonetheless.  I liked the mother's story line better than the main, daughter's one.  So, my next book was a "next" romance, which is apparently romance for the older crowd.  The protagonist was only 46, but a widow, so I guess it was a second-time-around story if not terribly "older" (than me at least).  It was called "The English Wife", though there wasn't really one, and I liked it better than the other. 3/5

My kids have swim lessons, so I need easy reads for poolside 25 minutes at a time!  That's my other excuse.

:)

Oh, and I'm watching "John Adams" the HBO movie miniseries.  It's great but I unfortunately read a review that said that Paul Giamatti looked like Uncle Fester, and now I can't really allow him to be kissing Laura Linney without a giggle.

Meg
brightly_woven: (Keats/books)
In trying to make up for lost time, I am reading some romance novels (they are shorter by far than most books I've read this year): so far, one steamy, one demure.  The steamy one was an Edwardian called "Private Arrangements".  2.5/3  Totally ridiculous but quite a romp nonetheless.  I liked the mother's story line better than the main, daughter's one.  So, my next book was a "next" romance, which is apparently romance for the older crowd.  The protagonist was only 46, but a widow, so I guess it was a second-time-around story if not terribly "older" (than me at least).  It was called "The English Wife", though there wasn't really one, and I liked it better than the other. 3/5

My kids have swim lessons, so I need easy reads for poolside 25 minutes at a time!  That's my other excuse.

:)

Oh, and I'm watching "John Adams" the HBO movie miniseries.  It's great but I unfortunately read a review that said that Paul Giamatti looked like Uncle Fester, and now I can't really allow him to be kissing Laura Linney without a giggle.

Meg
brightly_woven: (margarita)
a lovely BOOK MEME.  (if anyone other than the bard can tell me where that quote is from, I will be really impressed!  Hint: book meme is supposed to say 'beverage')

These are the top 106 books most often marked as "unread" by LibraryThing's users (as of today). As usual, bold what you have read, italicize what you started but couldn't finish, and strike through what you couldn't stand. The numbers after each one are the number of LT users who used the tag of that book.  (stolen from [personal profile] few, with this addition from [profile] julielu:  I'm adding an asterisk by the one's I've read more than once.)

The thing about this that made me want to giggle is my tendency to want to check off things that I had seen a movie version of, and later in the list, things I had read an abridged version of as children:  Jane Eyre, Treasure Island, David Copperfield.  I had forgotten how many abridged works I read (most I didn't realize were abridged until I started re-reading as an adult and thought--there is NO WAY I could've made it through this when I was 9 or 10 or whatever.  Though, come to think of it, I did read all 1036 pages of Gone With the Wind when in 5th grade.)

brightly_woven: (margarita)
a lovely BOOK MEME.  (if anyone other than the bard can tell me where that quote is from, I will be really impressed!  Hint: book meme is supposed to say 'beverage')

These are the top 106 books most often marked as "unread" by LibraryThing's users (as of today). As usual, bold what you have read, italicize what you started but couldn't finish, and strike through what you couldn't stand. The numbers after each one are the number of LT users who used the tag of that book.  (stolen from [personal profile] few, with this addition from [profile] julielu:  I'm adding an asterisk by the one's I've read more than once.)

The thing about this that made me want to giggle is my tendency to want to check off things that I had seen a movie version of, and later in the list, things I had read an abridged version of as children:  Jane Eyre, Treasure Island, David Copperfield.  I had forgotten how many abridged works I read (most I didn't realize were abridged until I started re-reading as an adult and thought--there is NO WAY I could've made it through this when I was 9 or 10 or whatever.  Though, come to think of it, I did read all 1036 pages of Gone With the Wind when in 5th grade.)

Books

Feb. 28th, 2007 12:46 pm
brightly_woven: (Mary/Collins by Katharino)
Since I'm trying to start Brightlywoven Designs, I decided not to take the 26-book challenge this year.  I have been slowly reading Jimmy Carter's Our Endangered Values, but it isn't done yet, so I haven't mentioned it.  Oh, and the Adobe Illustrator text from my course.  Yeah.

BUT, on my trip I did start and finish a lovely book from my favorite living author, Guy Gavriel Kay.  It's called Ysabel and is set in our world (which most of his books aren't), yet it has a Gaimanesque quality to it is that makes it otherworldly as well.   And it has echoes and more of his Fionavar Tapestry of 20 years ago--it was like going home again, while I was on my way home (both directions, really).  Easy read, lovely read. 

Thought I'd share...

Meg

Books

Feb. 28th, 2007 12:46 pm
brightly_woven: (Mary/Collins by Katharino)
Since I'm trying to start Brightlywoven Designs, I decided not to take the 26-book challenge this year.  I have been slowly reading Jimmy Carter's Our Endangered Values, but it isn't done yet, so I haven't mentioned it.  Oh, and the Adobe Illustrator text from my course.  Yeah.

BUT, on my trip I did start and finish a lovely book from my favorite living author, Guy Gavriel Kay.  It's called Ysabel and is set in our world (which most of his books aren't), yet it has a Gaimanesque quality to it is that makes it otherworldly as well.   And it has echoes and more of his Fionavar Tapestry of 20 years ago--it was like going home again, while I was on my way home (both directions, really).  Easy read, lovely read. 

Thought I'd share...

Meg

Update

Feb. 12th, 2007 12:59 pm
brightly_woven: (Mr Darcy IS smiling by mrbantural)
Welcome to my flist, [personal profile] jcscot!

I figured since I have a new friend, I should post about something other than nausea. :)


My Adobe Illustrator class is going very well.  I am loving the pen tool exercises we've been doing.  Too fun.

I also got a contract for another job!!!  A multi-page brochure, so of course I need InDesign and not Illustrator.  Sigh.  Hopefully I'm up to the task.


If you read this whole thing, you are a gem.

Meg

Update

Feb. 12th, 2007 12:59 pm
brightly_woven: (Mr Darcy IS smiling by mrbantural)
Welcome to my flist, [personal profile] jcscot!

I figured since I have a new friend, I should post about something other than nausea. :)


My Adobe Illustrator class is going very well.  I am loving the pen tool exercises we've been doing.  Too fun.

I also got a contract for another job!!!  A multi-page brochure, so of course I need InDesign and not Illustrator.  Sigh.  Hopefully I'm up to the task.


If you read this whole thing, you are a gem.

Meg

Profile

brightly_woven: (Default)
brightly_woven

May 2017

S M T W T F S
 123 456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 26th, 2017 10:34 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios