brightly_woven: (Default)
With my rambling entry, I missed some of the very highest of high points of the walk:

Right before bed after the 26.2 mile walk, I was talking to Tom and the boys and Aidan spontaneously started singing "our" song, which I sing to him most bedtimes, "You are my sunshine". It was so sweet and encouraging.

When I was freaking out about not being able to continue, I was getting really down on myself, and my team captain, Liz, said "As Anne Lamotte would say 'That thought is not from Jesus'", which was so totally what I needed to hear and have needed to keep repeating to myself that I was immediately relieved of this huge weight I had begun to load on myself. (Tonja was also very compassionate. Thanks, ladies!)

When Bob and Sarah showed up, they had a sign that read something like "Meg is our star", and then Mom, Tom and the boys showed up with more signs that said things like "Thank you, Mom" and "You make the world a better place". It was overwhelmingly touching.

I had forgotten to take my Pill the night before the walk, a forgetting which could have caused a migraine if not addressed, and then my bag was loaded on the truck before I could get it out of my dop kit. I told the volunteers that I needed to get the bag off the truck, and even though it held up everyone, they were willing to get it off for me and let me get my Pill. That was really special and above-and-beyond the call of duty.

Bonnie walked with me, even when I wasn't very fast, and I got to hear her "getting together with hubby" story. Another time I was walking with Renee and I got to hear hers too. It really takes your mind off sore feet when you have a good romance to hear! I also loved Bonnie's enjoyment of the beautiful houses we were walking by. My foot hurt a lot by then, but it was nice that she was so "present" to the walk and its environs. She looked great in a shirt decorated with her sister Peggy's picture. She and Renee had matching pretty but a little goofy visors--they were right in the spirit of things.

I'm sure more will surface, but these are the things I was dwelling on today.
brightly_woven: (Default)
With my rambling entry, I missed some of the very highest of high points of the walk:

Right before bed after the 26.2 mile walk, I was talking to Tom and the boys and Aidan spontaneously started singing "our" song, which I sing to him most bedtimes, "You are my sunshine". It was so sweet and encouraging.

When I was freaking out about not being able to continue, I was getting really down on myself, and my team captain, Liz, said "As Anne Lamotte would say 'That thought is not from Jesus'", which was so totally what I needed to hear and have needed to keep repeating to myself that I was immediately relieved of this huge weight I had begun to load on myself. (Tonja was also very compassionate. Thanks, ladies!)

When Bob and Sarah showed up, they had a sign that read something like "Meg is our star", and then Mom, Tom and the boys showed up with more signs that said things like "Thank you, Mom" and "You make the world a better place". It was overwhelmingly touching.

I had forgotten to take my Pill the night before the walk, a forgetting which could have caused a migraine if not addressed, and then my bag was loaded on the truck before I could get it out of my dop kit. I told the volunteers that I needed to get the bag off the truck, and even though it held up everyone, they were willing to get it off for me and let me get my Pill. That was really special and above-and-beyond the call of duty.

Bonnie walked with me, even when I wasn't very fast, and I got to hear her "getting together with hubby" story. Another time I was walking with Renee and I got to hear hers too. It really takes your mind off sore feet when you have a good romance to hear! I also loved Bonnie's enjoyment of the beautiful houses we were walking by. My foot hurt a lot by then, but it was nice that she was so "present" to the walk and its environs. She looked great in a shirt decorated with her sister Peggy's picture. She and Renee had matching pretty but a little goofy visors--they were right in the spirit of things.

I'm sure more will surface, but these are the things I was dwelling on today.
brightly_woven: (Default)
Well, this morning I am back from my Avon Walk, having raised $2796 to fight breast cancer and get breast health services to poor and underserved women in the SF area. (I had a fun experience of using my last $120 in donations to help a team of women who hadn't raised all their funds be able to walk, so the website only says $2676.) I also have outstanding promises for more funds based on the miles I walked.

That brings me to the miles I walked. The first day was beautiful, clear and hot. We crossed the Golden Gate bridge, walked through Sausalito to Mill Valley and back across the bridge. The first crossing was picture perfect, and I was able to really enjoy the views. On the way back it was 22 miles in and I just wanted to be DONE! And...I did it. 26.2 miles on the first day. And our whole team did it.

We slept the night in a windy, ocean-side field. In a tent with no air mattress. The less said about that, the better. (The yoga, food, and company were lovely, however.)

The second day was a little cooler (lunch was particularly frigid) and the walk all in San Francisco. Almost as soon as I started out, my feet were hurting. I was walking with a teammate, Bonnie, whom I usually walk well with, but I was having a problem keeping up with her because my left foot hurt. (The weird part about that is that I had seen a podiatrist for my right foot problems two weeks before the walk.) Now, after walking 26.2 miles the previous day, EVERYTHING hurt (even having done an hour of yoga afterwards to stretch out). But that kind of hurt was more of an ache. This new foot pain was acute and in a place I hadn't noticed any pain the day before. At the podiatrist, he had scolded me for not doing any really long walks (over 10 miles) and warned me about stress fractures.

So, when this new pain showed up, I immediately thought of his words. I decided to get vanned to the next rest stop with medical attention (they wanted me to go to lunch, but I wanted to walk as much as I could if the doc cleared me). I finally saw someone after much rigamorole and she told me to ice it, get bussed to the lunch stop, and walk from there (it's only 2 miles, she said). It turned out that lunch was something over 4 miles to the end. And, walking from the bus to the lunch and bathroom, even after a half an hour of ice, I knew that I couldn't walk 4 miles on it. I ended up getting bussed to the finish line, seen and medicated with lots of Advil by another doc, and waiting for my team. All four finished the WHOLE thing. I was so proud. And, since I had raised the money, walked the entire first day and some of the second, I decided to walk across the finish line with the group.

So, short story long, I walked 2.4 miles on the second day, for a grand total of 28.6 miles. (Plus at least another mile of walking to car, walking with 35 pound bag to tent at other end of field, walking to medical attention up weird hills--not to Avon: put the medical tent on a flatter part and closer to the front of the rest stops, etc.)

In retrospect, I half-wish that I had just drugged up and kept going. But, today I feel pretty great overall, and I can shop and walk and take care of my kids with only a little discomfort and no real pain. I don't know how I would feel had I continued walking--prouder of myself, certainly, but also possibly with longer-term consequences.

I have, however, made a commitment to myself to finish: walking the last 10.7 miles when my foot is fully healed. Since we're gone all of August and July might be too soon, I'm thinking September or October. My teammate Tonja has already agreed to walk it with me, and I think some of the others may too.

All in all, I feel such a mixture of emotions that I'm not sure where I'm at. Mostly, I'm just glad that I did so much and happy that it's over and I can get on with my pre-walk sort of life. I also know, though, that it had changed me in many ways I can't even see yet.

One final note. I had awesome support from my teammates: Bonnie, Liz, Renee and Tonja, and from Bob and Sarah & Tom, my mom, E and A, who all came to cheer me on at the end. And, of course, the financial supporters who all helped me beat back this horrid disease just a little farther.

Thank you all.

Meg
brightly_woven: (Default)
Well, this morning I am back from my Avon Walk, having raised $2796 to fight breast cancer and get breast health services to poor and underserved women in the SF area. (I had a fun experience of using my last $120 in donations to help a team of women who hadn't raised all their funds be able to walk, so the website only says $2676.) I also have outstanding promises for more funds based on the miles I walked.

That brings me to the miles I walked. The first day was beautiful, clear and hot. We crossed the Golden Gate bridge, walked through Sausalito to Mill Valley and back across the bridge. The first crossing was picture perfect, and I was able to really enjoy the views. On the way back it was 22 miles in and I just wanted to be DONE! And...I did it. 26.2 miles on the first day. And our whole team did it.

We slept the night in a windy, ocean-side field. In a tent with no air mattress. The less said about that, the better. (The yoga, food, and company were lovely, however.)

The second day was a little cooler (lunch was particularly frigid) and the walk all in San Francisco. Almost as soon as I started out, my feet were hurting. I was walking with a teammate, Bonnie, whom I usually walk well with, but I was having a problem keeping up with her because my left foot hurt. (The weird part about that is that I had seen a podiatrist for my right foot problems two weeks before the walk.) Now, after walking 26.2 miles the previous day, EVERYTHING hurt (even having done an hour of yoga afterwards to stretch out). But that kind of hurt was more of an ache. This new foot pain was acute and in a place I hadn't noticed any pain the day before. At the podiatrist, he had scolded me for not doing any really long walks (over 10 miles) and warned me about stress fractures.

So, when this new pain showed up, I immediately thought of his words. I decided to get vanned to the next rest stop with medical attention (they wanted me to go to lunch, but I wanted to walk as much as I could if the doc cleared me). I finally saw someone after much rigamorole and she told me to ice it, get bussed to the lunch stop, and walk from there (it's only 2 miles, she said). It turned out that lunch was something over 4 miles to the end. And, walking from the bus to the lunch and bathroom, even after a half an hour of ice, I knew that I couldn't walk 4 miles on it. I ended up getting bussed to the finish line, seen and medicated with lots of Advil by another doc, and waiting for my team. All four finished the WHOLE thing. I was so proud. And, since I had raised the money, walked the entire first day and some of the second, I decided to walk across the finish line with the group.

So, short story long, I walked 2.4 miles on the second day, for a grand total of 28.6 miles. (Plus at least another mile of walking to car, walking with 35 pound bag to tent at other end of field, walking to medical attention up weird hills--not to Avon: put the medical tent on a flatter part and closer to the front of the rest stops, etc.)

In retrospect, I half-wish that I had just drugged up and kept going. But, today I feel pretty great overall, and I can shop and walk and take care of my kids with only a little discomfort and no real pain. I don't know how I would feel had I continued walking--prouder of myself, certainly, but also possibly with longer-term consequences.

I have, however, made a commitment to myself to finish: walking the last 10.7 miles when my foot is fully healed. Since we're gone all of August and July might be too soon, I'm thinking September or October. My teammate Tonja has already agreed to walk it with me, and I think some of the others may too.

All in all, I feel such a mixture of emotions that I'm not sure where I'm at. Mostly, I'm just glad that I did so much and happy that it's over and I can get on with my pre-walk sort of life. I also know, though, that it had changed me in many ways I can't even see yet.

One final note. I had awesome support from my teammates: Bonnie, Liz, Renee and Tonja, and from Bob and Sarah & Tom, my mom, E and A, who all came to cheer me on at the end. And, of course, the financial supporters who all helped me beat back this horrid disease just a little farther.

Thank you all.

Meg
brightly_woven: (Default)
I'm having trouble finding time to do my big training walk--and the Avon Walk is only 3 weeks (less!) away.

This week my distraction is Vacation Bible School. I'm teaching the interactive Bible lesson every day, and I need to memorize lines, rearrange the set and present the "show" 4 times/morning. E (7) and A (5 minus 5 days) are enjoying participating yet again. This is E's 5th or 6th year! Being a stay-at-home mom has its perqs and this week is definitely one of them--though it sometimes feels more like work than others.

Next weekend is A's 5th birthday party and then...

My mom and stepdad come to visit, her for 2 weeks, him for one. We are all (minus Tom) going up to Yosemite. My mom has never been, even though we make an annual trek (it's only 3.5 hours to the valley floor from our house).

Oh well, I'll walk on July 8-9 at the very least!
brightly_woven: (Default)
I'm having trouble finding time to do my big training walk--and the Avon Walk is only 3 weeks (less!) away.

This week my distraction is Vacation Bible School. I'm teaching the interactive Bible lesson every day, and I need to memorize lines, rearrange the set and present the "show" 4 times/morning. E (7) and A (5 minus 5 days) are enjoying participating yet again. This is E's 5th or 6th year! Being a stay-at-home mom has its perqs and this week is definitely one of them--though it sometimes feels more like work than others.

Next weekend is A's 5th birthday party and then...

My mom and stepdad come to visit, her for 2 weeks, him for one. We are all (minus Tom) going up to Yosemite. My mom has never been, even though we make an annual trek (it's only 3.5 hours to the valley floor from our house).

Oh well, I'll walk on July 8-9 at the very least!

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